Gosse waste pit closes after handling 21,000 tonnes of rubble, steel from Kangaroo Island bushfire

The bushfire waste recovery facility at Gosse on western Kangaroo Island took its last load and closed its gates on Friday, June 19.

There is plenty of work ahead however with plans to fence off and re-vegetate site in bushland just west of the Western Districts oval.

Working on site over the last five months has been KI local Walter "Wally" Martain, employed by the Fleurieu Regional Waste Authority.

The former mine worker said it had been a fascinating experience and he had enjoyed helping out with the Island's bushfire recovery.

"It's been sad to see everyone's belongings come through but it's been good to have helped the clean-up," he said.

A resident of Baudin Beach, he had been living in his holiday house at Vivonne Bay to shorten the commute.

FRWA regional manager Darren Stephens said Mr Martin had done a great job with the "Gosse pit", which had functioned well throughout the recovery process.

"It' been a great outcome for the community, there was a bit of delay getting things going but since then everything has run smoothly," Mr Stephens said.

The Gosse pit had accepted about 18,000 tonnes of asbestos contaminated rubble from 89 properties.

About 2000 tonnes of rubble also went to the pit at the Kingscote FRWA facility.

The rubble had been buried in deep pits and capped off, with the Environment Protection Authority inspecting and approving each step.

Also accepted was about 3000 tonnes of steel waste that and still being processed for shipping to the mainland for recycling.

Destroyed fencing from bushfire affected farms around Kangaroo Island was the last material to come through the Gosse facility.

Destroyed fencing from bushfire affected farms around Kangaroo Island was the last material to come through the Gosse facility.

Still coming in was about 1100 kilometres of fencing wire.

Mr Stephens said now that the Green Industries SA bushfire waste collection program had finished, anyone who had waste on their properties would be responsible for its disposal themselves.

FRWA was now working with the Landscapes board and KI Native Plant Nursery to plant 3000 trees and direct seed the Gosse pit area that will also soon be fenced off.

"I want to be able to drive past in a few years and not be able to tell anything had been there," he said.

This story Gosse waste pit closes after handling 21,000 tonnes of bushfire rubble, steel first appeared on The Islander.

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