Students support headspace

VISITORS: From left, UniSA Occupational Therapy students Amy McLaughlin, Tanner O'Reilly and headspace Community Engagement Officer Courtney Beer.

VISITORS: From left, UniSA Occupational Therapy students Amy McLaughlin, Tanner O'Reilly and headspace Community Engagement Officer Courtney Beer.

Headspace Whyalla is getting a helping hand from two Occupational Therapy students who are working to strengthen the bond between the mental health service and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth.

Tanner O'Reilly and Amy McLaughlin from the University of South Australia have been speaking with young indigenous people in the community about the issues they face and how headspace can better support them.

The duo will aim to give headspace the tools to continue to engage with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth in Whyalla by the end of their nine week stay.

"The mental health aspect for young Aboriginal people is very different to Western society, so we want to give them a chance to feel comfortable about discussing that," Amy said.

Amy and Tanner have spent their first two weeks talking to different agencies, organisations and community members about their views on the Aboriginal community, as well as members of the community themselves.

"We're trying to get the biggest base we can to move on to visibly doing something," Amy said.

Headspace Whyalla Community Engagement Officer Courtney Beer hopes the end result of the work between the students is a stronger bond between headspace and the Aboriginal community.

"We want to give young Aboriginal people some opportunities to be in a reference group or shape the way we deliver services," she said.

"We've talked about how they could come in and do murals in the centre to help foster that connection."

To get in contact directly with Amy or Tanner email them on mclaj011@mymail.unisa.edu.au or ority001@mymail.unisa.edu.au.