Don a flanny for a farmer

FLANNY: TAFE SA Regional Business Development Officer Megan Cox, Whyalla CWA President June Phillips-Smith and Student Counselor Steven Ravanelli.
FLANNY: TAFE SA Regional Business Development Officer Megan Cox, Whyalla CWA President June Phillips-Smith and Student Counselor Steven Ravanelli.

Whyalla TAFE SA staff will be donning their favourite flanny next week to raise money for farmers battling dry conditions across South Australia.

All money raised will be donated to the SA Country Womens Association (SACWA) for distribution to South Australian farmers through the SACWA Emergency Aid Fund.

Flanny for a Farmer Day will take place on Thursday, September 13, in conjunction with TAFE SA Wellbeing Day and R U OK Day?

Regional Business Development Officer Megan Cox encouraged the community to join in a barbecue in the TAFE SA Whyalla student lounge area by donning flannelette shirts and donating a gold coin.

“I travel right across the Whyalla-Eyre Peninsula area, and we’ve noticed the effects that the dry conditions are having right up to Ceduna,” she said.

“This is a good opportunity to get together and make a little footprint for our region. Every little bit helps.”

Country Outback Health, headspace and the Community Mental Health Rehab Unit will be attending the event to provide mental health support and information to staff, students and community members.

Student Counselor Steve Ravanelli aid it was important to acknowledge the impact the drought was having on the mental health of farmers around the state.

“We’ll be promoting some wellbeing and resliience strategies through some print-outs we’ve designed,” he said.

Whyalla CWA President June Phillips-Smith said farmers in need should contact the SACWA head office on 8332 4166.

“A lot of people, especially in this area, are in need of assistance because of the dry conditions,” she said.

The idea for Flanny for a Farmer Day was suggested by Julie Hollitt, an Information Services Officer based at TAFE SA’s Elizabeth Campus.

“It was an idea that I thought would be easy for staff and students to participate in and show empathy to people who are doing it tough in our own backyard at the same time,” Julie said.

“A person once said to me if you want to make a difference you should think globally and act locally – and this small gesture will hopefully have a big impact on those who need it most.”