Community vote early

POLLING: Members of the community took their chance to vote early at the Pre-poll Voting Centre set up at TAFE SA on Friday.
POLLING: Members of the community took their chance to vote early at the Pre-poll Voting Centre set up at TAFE SA on Friday.

Pre-polling has begun in Whyalla with residents unable to vote on Saturday, March 17 getting the chance to have their say early.

The local pre-polling centre is set up at TAFE SA, and will be open today until 5pm and then from Tuesday, March 13 until Friday, March 16 from 9am to 5pm.

However voters must have a valid reason to vote early.

South Australian legislation entitles you to cast a pre-poll vote if, on polling day, you:

  • are more than 8 km from a polling booth
  • are travelling 
  • are ill, infirm or disabled – preventing you from attending a polling booth
  • are caring for someone who is ill, infirm or disabled - preventing you from attending a polling booth
  • are due to give birth shortly
  • have religious beliefs preventing you from attending a polling booth
  • are working and unable to leave your workplace to vote
  • are a resident of a declared institution
  • are a resident of a prescribed institution (specifically, the Adelaide Remand Centre, Port Augusta Prison or Yatala Labour Farm)
  • have your address suppressed on the electoral roll (a silent elector)

If you’re wondering how exactly the voting process works, below is a guide based on the instructions provided by the SA Electoral Commission:

When voting at the State Election you will be given two ballot papers: a green paper for the House of Assembly and a white paper for the Legislative Council.

On the green ballot paper number, you need to number every square in the order of your choice.

  • Write the number 1 in the square next to the candidate who is your first choice
  • Write the number 2 next to your second choice
  • Continue by placing the numbers 3, 4, 5 and so on until you have a number in EVERY square. 

The white ballot paper is for the Legislative Council.

On the white ballot paper number, there are two ways you can vote. You can vote either above the red line orbelow the line – but not both.

How to vote above the red line:

If you choose to vote above the red line:

Write the number ‘1’ in the square next to the party or group of candidates which is your first choice.

If you want to, you can write the number 2 next to your second choice, and so on for as many parties or groups of candidates as you like. You do not need to number every square.

Leave the rest of the ballot paper blank. Do not mark below the red line.  

By voting above the red line, your vote will only go to the candidates within the group (or groups) you vote for.

To vote below the line:

If you choose to vote below the red line:

Write the number ‘1’ in the square next to the candidate who is your first choice below the red line 

Then continue by writing the numbers 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and so on in the squares next to the other candidates to show the order in which you prefer them, until you have chosen at least 12 candidates. 

You may choose to continue numbering more than 12 candidates, but the minimum number of squares you need to mark is TWELVE if you choose to vote below the line.  

By voting below the red line you decide the order of your preferences for individual candidates.

The candidates for the seat of Giles are Labor Member Eddie Hughes, SA Best candidate Tom Antonio, Liberal candidate Mark Walsh, Australian Conservatives candidate Cheryl Kaminski, Dignity Party candidate Cyanne Westerman and Greens candidate Ana Taylor.