Point Lowly fight not over

The fight is not over for the Alternative Ports Working Party, who will continue to push for industrialisation to be carried out away from the Point Lowly Peninsula.

Alternative Ports Working Party spokesperson Sid Wilson said the group would continue to push for alternative sites for port and desalination developments.

Mr Wilson said the group intended to follow the government's movements with a $1.5 million review of infrastructure needs for the state to ensure all issues were being properly addressed.

"It [Nonowie port development] is still worth looking at, and there are other options for ports south of Whyalla and we'd hope that this strategic review that's going to be funded by the federal government and carried out over the next 12 months will pick up honestly reviewing and aggressively reviewing what the alternatives for a port are," he said.

Mr Wilson said the group maintained the view that an area of land south of Whyalla was the ideal location for the development of a deep sea port facility.

"I think the need is still there to have a port with decent rail links from the north and the north-east," he said.

"We continue to hold our position and will lobby for less ports, possibly only one port.

"We still think Nonowie's got a lot of up sides because it has plenty of water and land and it's accessible, so Nonowie ought to be a critical part for the $1.5 million investigation.

"Nonowie is not very valuable land; it's just flat and hardly has a sheep on it.

"It's the sort of land that ought to be developed for industry rather than knocking off our good quality coastal and marine land.

Mr Wilson said the group believed thorough research and studies into the best development for these industrial facilities was necessary before going ahead with any development.

"A port was needed urgently four years ago, that's why they were going to plug it into Lowly, and four years has gone and nothing has happened," he said.

"I think it's critical to get the message across to the main players, plus the community, that the next 12 to 18 months to do the review, including the value of Lowly to the local community as it is now and what it might be for diversity and sustainability.

"The pressure is still on to get the answer, and the answer is to get the right answer by scientific and engineering and common sense."

Alternative Ports Working Party will continue to consider all industrial developments and the factors surrounding their development and lobby for the most suitable developments for the area.

STILL FIGHTING: Members of the Alternative Ports Working Party will continue to fight against the industrialisation of Point Lowly Peninsula. Alternative Ports Working Party spokesperson Sid Wilson said the group was dedicated to protecting Point Lowly.

STILL FIGHTING: Members of the Alternative Ports Working Party will continue to fight against the industrialisation of Point Lowly Peninsula. Alternative Ports Working Party spokesperson Sid Wilson said the group was dedicated to protecting Point Lowly.

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