School hosts workshop

WORKSHOP: Stuart High School students Byron Maddigan, Colby Baker, left, with student engagement officer Felicity Crowther and presenter Leeanne Marshall.
WORKSHOP: Stuart High School students Byron Maddigan, Colby Baker, left, with student engagement officer Felicity Crowther and presenter Leeanne Marshall.

Students at Stuart High School recently learned about the job opportunities in the disability sector as part of a national workshop program.

ProjectABLE promotes disability awareness, and included a number of presentations from those living with a disability.

Student Engagement Officer Felicity Crowther said ProjectABLE focused on educating students about disabilities and the importance of positions in the sector.

“The students have really enjoyed it, we had some local service providers come along and they were able to talk to students about some of the job opportunities there’s going to be in Whyalla,” she said.

“That really made the students think about some of the jobs in the sector which might suit them.”

Heidi MacDonald from Regional Development Australia Whyalla and Eyre Peninsula helped organise the event.

More than 250 new jobs will be created in the disability sector in the Eyre and Western region including Whyalla over the next three years.

This is according to a recent report by the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) on the impact of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS).

Mrs Crowther said the disability support worker position would be the ‘most obvious’ choice for students, however the sector is quite diverse.

“It’s a great starting block to move into some of the other careers, there’s team leader and management positions, we also talked to students about the allied health roles that come into the disability sector,” she said.

“These include phsyiotherapy and occupational therapy, and also the business side of things, every disability organisation needs a business team which includes IT and human resources positions.”

Workshop presenter Leeanne Marshall, who was diagnosed with Autism at 18 years old, said she enjoyed presenting to students.

“It’s always great presenting to different students, it’s all about disability awareness and making them aware about what they can do personally to help people with disabilities,” she said.

“I think the majority of students have been interested in aspects of the workshop, I definitely have seen some students interested in going on to careers in the disability sector.”

“There’s very limited services for autistic individuals at the moment because the NDIS hasn’t rolled out into adults yet, we need a lot more young people wanting to work in this area.”

ProjectABLE also visited Edward John Eyre High School and Whyalla High School during their time in Whyalla.