RiskIt park’s fresh look

Artist Matt Stuckey led a team of young artists to give RiskIt skate park a bright new look.
Artist Matt Stuckey led a team of young artists to give RiskIt skate park a bright new look.

RiskIt skate park’s bright new look has been given the tick of approval from skaters and bike riders.

The paint had barely dried when youths could not wait any longer and tested out the new look park.

Adelaide-based artist Matt Stuckey led a team of young artists to paint the surface of the park with an orange, blue and black design.

“I’m really happy with how it looks and with all the helpers we’ve had,” Mr Stuckey said.

“All the members of the public who have come past have liked it and all kids who skate here are loving it; I think they’re quite proud to see something they use get some attention.”

D'faces of Youth Arts partnered with Whyalla City Council for the project and included D’faces members, students from Stuart High School as well as anyone who walked past and picked up a brush.

"I much prefer an environment that is full of interesting things rather than grey concrete and swear words."

D'faces creative director Deb Hughes

D'faces creative director Deb Hughes said the project used input from local youth to give them a sense of ownership of the space.

Mrs Hughes said the aim of involving youth was for young people to have pride in their city meaning they would not want to vandalise it.

She said the fresh look would add vibrancy to Civic Park and D’faces was hoping to complete more large-scale public works in the future.

“I think public artworks benefit the whole community,” she said.

“I much prefer an environment that is full of interesting things rather than grey concrete and swear words."

Mr Stuckey said aspiring artists needed more than just talent to make it in the field.

“For anyone who wants to pursue it, you have to remember it is actually a job,” he said.

“Once you get good at painting the big difficulty many people have is, at art school they never teach you business.

“You need to learn to manage your time and learn to send an invoice.”

Young artist Stacey Brougham was one of the D’faces members who worked on the park and said D’faces was a good environment for creative people.

“It’s an environment that’s very nurturing of creative minds, when you go there you are around like-minded people and can bounce ideas off each other,” Ms Brougham said.