Ultra care given to teach ultrasound practices

Obstetrics and gynaecology specialist Doctor Karen Shand teaches Doctors on Playford Doctor Shoma Chowdhury about ultrasound techniques on pregnant patient Karlie Neuss.
Obstetrics and gynaecology specialist Doctor Karen Shand teaches Doctors on Playford Doctor Shoma Chowdhury about ultrasound techniques on pregnant patient Karlie Neuss.

Regional health professionals were provided with a valuable opportunity to learn first-hand how to thoroughly use ultrasound equipment recently.

A two-day workshop was held at University of South Australia Whyalla campus by the University Department of Rural Health and the Australasian Society of Ultrasound in Medicine for regional health professionals to access training.

Midwives, doctors and allied health services professionals from Whyalla, Roxby Downs, Alice Springs, Ceduna, Wudinna, Port Augusta and Port Lincoln travelled far and wide to take part.

Whyalla hospital registered nurse /midwife Tracey Paterson said many of the workshop attendees did not have staff on hand to show them how to utilise imaging equipment so the experience would help them to feel comfortable using the machine.

"It's about educating people on having to use the machine for good patient outcomes," Mrs Paterson said.

"Having simulated patients give a very real experience and an opportunity to engage interaction with the patient and then get feedback from the patient on how to perfect the procedure performed."

Local pregnant women in varying stages of pregnancy were invited to attend the workshop to be test patients.

Mrs Paterson said the experience also offered a learning opportunity for the test patients as it helped them to learn more about their pregnancy.

Test patient Carly Manners said the experience had not only benefitted the workshop attendees but she was also happy she could help.

"As a teacher, I understand that everybody has to learn somewhere and so this was a good opportunity to assist people to further their knowledge," Ms Manners said.

"I can also relate to the challenges that occur from being in a regional area and accessing resources so I was happy to help."

Mrs Paterson said the health professional would now be able to take the information and experience gained back to their community or work sites.